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*DUAL ENROLLMENT CREDIT IS NOT GUARANTEED!

Students MUST meet the pre-requisites for any specific course AND complete the registration process through the dual credit institution (CNM, UNM, IAIA).

All dual credit students must be registered in classes prior to the start of the term in which the classes are scheduled.

CEC instructors and the CEC counselor will assist students in enrolling in the course in the first few days of class at CEC, but it is the STUDENT'S responsibility to be sure that they are registered for the dual credit course.

It is also the STUDENT'S responsibility to adhere to any deadlines for dropping or adding a class through the dual credit institution. 

For more information about enrolling in dual credit classes, please see the CEC Dual Credit page.

Native American Classes

Rev: Oct. 31, 2022

 


Native American Government/Economics and Native Studies I and II

cornGrades:  9-12 can receive APS credit
General Information:  This course offers both Government and Economics credit and meets the APS graduation requirement and state content standards. The course teaches Government and Economics through a Native American perspective.

 

Session / Days / Times Course Length Credit Information
Session II
M-F
12:30-1:50 pm
Full Year 0.5 credit in Govt and Nat Studies  1.0= Fall
0.5 credit in Econ and Nat Studies  1.0= Spring


Government is a required course that provides the student with a framework for understanding the purposes, principles, and practices of American and Native American (Tribal) government as established by the United States Constitution.  The student analyzes the history and changing interpretations of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the current state of the legislative, executive, and judiciary branches of government.  In addition, he/she examines his/her rights and responsibilities as a dual citizen and how to exercise them as well as experience the political process at local state, tribal, and national levels of governments.

Economics is a semester course with an emphasis on the allocation of scarce resources and the economic reasoning used by government agencies, Native American tribes, and by people in various economic roles.  The student examines topics such as scarcity, supply and demand, market structures, the role of government, money, the role of financial institutions, and international trade.

Native American Leadership and PERFORMING ARTS

weavingGrade:  10-12
Prerequisites:   None

Native American Leadership is an advanced Native American Studies (NAS) course designed for students who take an additional interest in the Native American Performing Arts.  This course is designed to give a thorough and in depth look at contemporary and traditional forms of Native American leadership and government.  It allows students to explore performing arts by applying music and leadership to the knowledge learned in previous NAS classes by asserting and demonstrating leadership, motivational, and skills-building techniques.  Expectations are high as students are required to head school and community project planning committees, present information to a variety of audiences using various mediums and technologies (e.g., video, power point, poster boards), and communicate and engage with local Native American organizations.

Session / Days / Times Course Length Credit Information
Session IIIA
M & W
2:00p-4:15p   
*Students will be expected to participate in after-school events and activities.
Full Year 1.5 elective credits per semester

 

Navajo History and Government

Grade:  12
Prerequisites:  A CIB and a 506 Form on file with Indian Education Department

Navajo History and Government will offer the history and government of the Navajo Nation. Major historical themes include the Navajo Creation story, Navajo Long Walk, Stock Reduction, and the Navajo Code Talkers. Major government themes will include the traditional Navajo leadership, the Navajo Treaty of 1868, the evolution of the Navajo Nation Chapters, evolution of the Navajo Tribal Council, and the Navajo government today. Curriculum is developed by the Navajo Nation Office of Dine’ Culture, Language and Community Services and is designed to qualify Navajo Nation students for the Chief Manuelito Scholarship. This class does NOT count for Govt credit for graduation purposes.

Session / Days / Times Course Length Credit Information
Session IB
Tu & Th
7:30-9:50 am
Fall -OR- Spring semester 0.5 elective credit per semester

 

Navajo I and II

shiprocksGrades:  10-12
Prerequisites:   Students taking Navajo II must have a passing grade in Navajo I.  Students also must be enrolled in a federally recognized tribe and have a 506 and CIB data on file with the district.

IAIA Dual Credit may be available, but is not guaranteed.* IAIA Dual Credit is a possibility for those students who meet the requirements. Qualified students may earn credit for IAIA NAVJ101 and IAIA NAVJ102.

Would you like to learn a language spoken by grandparents, parents, and tribal leaders? This class teaches students to read and write Navajo and opens doors to understand Southwestern culture:

  • This class will allow students to study Navajo culture, traditions, and language.
  • Successful completion of both classes will qualify students for the district and state bilingual seals.
  • This class satisfies the language requirement to be eligible for the Chief Manuelito Scholarship, which is given only to eligible Navajo students who have taken a Navajo class. Students also need 0.5 credit of Navajo Government (also offered at CEC)  and a 3.0 GPA.
Session / Days / Times Course Length Credit Information
Session IB
Tu & Th
7:30-9:50 am
Fall: Navajo I
Spring: Navajo II
Navajo I: 1.0 elective credit for Semester I
Navajo II: 1.0 elective credit for Semester II
Session II
Tu-F
12:30-1:30 pm
Fall: Navajo I
Spring: Navajo II
Navajo I: 1.0 elective credit for Semester I
Navajo II: 1.0 elective credit for Semester II

ONLINE ONLY
Times and meeting dates to be
determined by Instructor

Fall: Navajo I
Spring: Navajo II
Navajo I: 1.0 elective credit for Semester I
Navajo II: 1.0 elective credit for Semester II


Navajo I (IAIA NAVJ101*):  Introduces students to the basic skills – listening and speaking – and to the basic structures of Navajo taught within the cultural context.  Areas of study include expression, comprehension, language and culture, language functions, connections and personal applications.  Emphasis is placed on:

  • Listening, and speaking
  • Communication skills
  • Cultural activities

Navajo II (IAIA NAVJ102*):  Language acquisition is a developmental process aimed at the ultimate goal of communication. Over time the student develops the ability to write and speak in a meaningful and appropriate manner.  Navajo II continues the focus on the basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing as well as encourages deeper appreciation of the Navajo culture and language. Areas of study include expression, comprehension, language and culture, cultures, language functions, connections, and personal applications. Emphasis is placed on applying oral, written, communication skills to personal, academic, and cultural activities. 

Shiwi’Ma Bena: We / Zuni Language I and II

weavingGrades: 10-12video link
Prerequisites:  Students will be an enrolled member of the Pueblo of Zuni and have a 506 and a CIB document on file with the APS Indian Education Department.  Students taking Zuni II will have successfully completed Zuni I. 

Would you like to learn a language spoken by your grandparents, parents, and tribal leaders?  Zuni language classes reconnect students to their families and communities.  Zuni students will:

  • Be immersed in listening, speaking, reading, and writing the Zuni language.
  • Successfully complete Zuni I and II language classes and qualify for the APS Indian Education Department's Native American Bilingual Seal and state bilingual seal.
Session / Days / Times Course Length Credit Information
Session IA
Mon  •  7:30-8:50 am and
Tu & Th  •  7:30-9:50 am
Zuni I:  Fall
Zuni II:  Spring
Zuni I: 1.0 elective credit for Sem I
Zuni II: 1.0 elective credit for Sem II
Session II
M-Th
12:30-1:50 pm
Zuni I:  Fall
Zuni II:  Spring
Zuni I: 1.0 elective credit for Sem I
Zuni II: 1.0 elective credit for Sem II


Zuni I: introduces students to the basic skills – listening and speaking – and to the basic structures of Zuni taught within the cultural context.  Areas of study include expression, comprehension, language and culture, language functions, connections and personal applications.  Emphasis is placed on:

  • Listening, and speaking
  • Communication skills
  • Cultural activities

Zuni II:  Language acquisition is a developmental process aimed at the ultimate goal of communication. Over time the student develops the ability to write and speak in a meaningful and appropriate manner.  Zuni II continues the focus on the basic language skills and proceeds to an intermediate level of listening, speaking, reading, and writing as well as encouraging deeper appreciation of the Zuni language and culture. Areas of study include expression, comprehension, language and culture, cultures, language functions, connections, and personal applications. Emphasis is placed on applying oral, written, communication skills to academic, personal, and Zuni language activities.